/ Vifm / Documentation


Index

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS
General keys
Basic Movement
Movement with Count
Scrolling panes
Pane manipulation
Marks
Searching
File Filters
Other Normal Mode Keys
Using Count
Registers
Selectors
Visual Mode
View Mode
Command line Mode
Command line editing
Commands
Ranges
Command macros
Command backgrounding
Globs
:set options
Mappings
Expression syntax
Functions
Menus and dialogs
Startup
Configure
Automatic FUSE mounts
View look
ls-like view
Column view
Color schemes
Trash directory
Client−Server
Plugin
Reserved
SEE ALSO
AUTHOR


NAME

vifm − vi file manager

SYNOPSIS

vifm [OPTION]...
vifm [OPTION]... LWIN_DIR
vifm [OPTION]... LWIN_DIR RWIN_DIR

DESCRIPTION

Vifm is a ncurses based file manager with vi like keybindings. If you use vi, vifm gives you complete keyboard control over your files without having to learn a new set of commands.

OPTIONS

The vifm executable will start vifm in the current directory unless it is given a different directory on the command line.
<lwinpath>

Starts Vifm in the specified path.

<lwinpath> <rwinpath>

Starts Vifm in the specified paths.

Specifying two directories triggers split view even when vifm was in single-view mode on finishing previous session. To suppress this behaviour :only command can be put in the vifmrc file.

When only one path argument is found on command-line, the left/top pane is automatically set as the current view.

Paths to files are also allowed in case you want vifm to start with some archive opened. If you want to select file, prepend its path with −−select.

−f

only used from the vifm.vim script. The selected files are written to $VIFM/vimfiles and vifm exits.

−−logging

Log some errors to $VIFM/log. Also /var/log/vifm−startup−log (on *nix) and startup−log in the directory of executable (on Windows) is used to log startup process (when configuration directory isn’t determined).

−−remote

Sends the rest of command line to the active vifm server (one of already running instances if any). When there is no server, quits silently. There is no limit on how many arguments can be processed. One can combine −−remote with −c <command> or +<command> to execute command in already running instance of vifm. See also "Client−Server" section below.

−c <command> or +<command>

Run command-line mode <command> on startup. Commands in such arguments are executed in the order they appear in command line. Commands with spaces or special symbols must be enclosed in double or single quotes or all special symbols should be escaped (the exact syntax strongly depends on shell).

−−help, −h

Show an overview of the commandline options.

−−version, −v

Show version information and quit.

−−no−configs

Don’t read vifmrc and vifminfo.

See Startup section below for the explanations on $VIFM.

General keys

Ctrl-C or Escape

cancel most operations.

Ctrl-C or Escape

clear all selected files.

Ctrl-L

clear and redraw the screen.

Basic Movement

The basic vi key bindings are used to move through the files and popup windows.
k, gk, or Ctrl-P

moves cursor up one line.

j, gj or Ctrl-N

moves cursor down one line.

h

when ’lsview’ is off moves up one directory, otherwise moves left one file.

l

when ’lsview’ is off moves into a directory or launches a file, otherwise moves left one file.

gg

move to the top of the file list.

gh

moves up one directory.

gl or Enter

moves into a directory or launches a file.

G

move to the bottom of the file list.

H

move to the first file in the window.

M

move to the file in the middle of the window.

L

move to the last file in the window.

Ctrl-F or Page Down

move forward one page.

Ctrl-B or Page Up

move back one page.

Ctrl-D

jump back one half page.

Ctrl-U

jump forward one half page.

n%

move to the file that is n percent from the top of the list (for example 25%).

0 or ^

move cursor to the first column. See ’lsview’ option description.

$

move cursor to the last column. See ’lsview’ option description.

Space Bar

toggles between the two file lists.

Movement with Count

Most movement commands also accept a count, 12j would move down 12
files.
[count]%

move to percent of the file list.

[count]j

move down count files.

[count]k

move up count files.

[count]G or [count]gg

move to list position count.

Scrolling panes

zt

redraw pane with file in top of list.

zz

redraw pane with file in center of list.

zb

redraw pane with file in bottom of list.

Ctrl-E

scroll pane one line down.

Ctrl-Y

scroll pane one line up.

Pane manipulation

Second character can be entered with or without Control key.
Ctrl-W H

move the pane to the far left.

Ctrl-W J

move the pane to the very bottom.

Ctrl-W K

move the pane to the very top.

Ctrl-W L

move the pane to the far right.

Ctrl-W b

switch to bottom-right window.

Ctrl-W h

switch to the left pane.

Ctrl-W j

switch to the pane below.

Ctrl-W k

switch to the pane above.

Ctrl-W l

switch to the right pane.

Ctrl-W o

shortcut for :only

Ctrl-W p

switch to previous window.

Ctrl-W s

shortcut for :split

Ctrl-W t

switch to top-left window.

Ctrl-W v

shortcut for :vsplit

Ctrl-W w

switch to other pane.

Ctrl-W x

exchange panes.

[count1]Ctrl-W[count2]+

increase size of the view by count1*count2.

[count1]Ctrl-W[count2]−

decrease size of the view by count1*count2..

[count1]Ctrl-W[count2]<

increase size of the view by count1*count2..

[count1]Ctrl-W[count2]>

decrease size of the view by count1*count2..

Ctrl-W |

maximize current view.

Ctrl-W _

maximize current view.

Ctrl-W =

make size of two views equal.

Marks

Marks are set the same way as they are in vi.

You can use this characters for marks [a−z][A−Z][0−9].
m[a−z][A−Z][0−9]

to set a mark for the current file.

’[a−z][A−Z][0−9]

moves to the file set for the mark.

Searching

/regular expression pattern[Return]

will highlight all files matching the pattern and go to the next match.

?regular expression pattern[Return]

will highlight all files matching the pattern and go to the previous match.

[count]n

find the next match of / or ?.

[count]N

find the previous match of / or ?.

If ’hlsearch’ option is set, hitting n/N to perform search and go to
the first matching item resets current selection in normal mode. It is
not the case if search was already performed on files in the directory,
thus selection is not reset after clearing selection with escape key
and hitting n/N key again.
[count]f[character]

search forward for file with [character] as first character in name. Search wraps around the end of the list.

[count]F[character]

search backward for file with [character] as first character in name. Search wraps around the end of the list.

[count];

find the next match of f or F.

[count],

find the previous match of f or F.

Note: f, F, ; and , wrap around list beginning and end when they are used alone and they don’t wrap when they are used as selectors.

File Filters

There are three basic file filters:

dot files filter (excluding "." and ".." special directories, which appearance is controlled by the ’dotdirs’ option)

manual filter for file names

automatic filter for file names

local filter for file names (see description of the "=" normal mode command)

Performing operations on manual filter for file names automatically does the same on automatic one. The file name filter is separated mainly for convenience purpose and to get more deterministic behaviour.

The basic vim folding key bindings are used for filtering files.
Each file list has its own copy of each filter.
Filtered files are not checked in / search or :commands.
Files and directories are filtered separately. For this a slash is
appended to a directory name before testing whether it matches the
filter. Examples:

" filter directories which names end with ’.files’
:filter /^.*\.files\/$/

" filter files which names end with ’.d’
:filter /^.*\.d$/

" filter files and directories which names end with ’.o’
:filter /^.*\.o\/?$/

zo

Show all of the dot files.

zf

Filter all of the selected files.

za

Toggle the showing and hiding of dot files.

zm

Filter all of the dot files.

zO

Show the files filtered out by filename filter.

zM

Filter the files matching the filename filter.

zR

Remove all filters.

=regular expression pattern[Return]

filter out files that don’t match regular expression. This kind of filter is automatically reset when directory is changed.

Other Normal Mode Keys

[count]:

enter command line mode. Count will add range.

q:

open external editor to prompt for command-line command. See "Command line editing" section for details.

q/

open external editor to prompt for search pattern to be searched in forward direction. See "Command line editing" section for details.

q?

open external editor to prompt for search pattern to be searched in backward direction. See "Command line editing" section for details.

q=

open external editor to prompt for filter pattern. See "Command line editing" section for details. Unlike other q{x} commands this one doesn’t work in Visual mode.

[count]!! and [count]!<selector>

enter command line mode with entered ! command. Count will modify range.

Ctrl-O

go backward through history.

Ctrl-I

if ’cpoptions’ contains "t" flag, <tab> and <c-i> switch active pane just like <space> does, otherwise it goes forward through directory history of the current view.

Ctrl-G

creates a window showing detailed information about the current file.

Shift-Tab

enters view mode (works only after activating view pane with :view command).

ga

calculate directory size.

gA

like ga, but force update.

gf

find link destination (like l with ’followlinks’ off, but also finds directories).

gr

only for MS-Windows

same as l key, but tries to run program with administrative privileges.

gv

go to visual mode restoring last selection.

gs

restore last t selection, like gv for visual mode selection.

gu<selector>

make names of selected files lowercase.

[count]guu and [count]gugu

make names of [count] files starting from the current one lowercase. Without [count] only current file is affected.

gU<selector>

make names of selected files uppercase.

[count]gUU and [count]gUgU

make names of [count] files starting from the current one uppercase. Without [count] only current file is affected.

e

explore file in the current pane.

i

opens file with associated program even if it’s an executable.

cw

rename a file or files.

cW

change only name of file (without extension).

cl

change link target.

co

only for *nix

change file owner.

cg

only for *nix

change file group.

cp

change file attributes (permission on *nix and properties on Windows).

[count]C

clone file [count] times.

[count]dd or d[count]selector

moves the selected files to trash directory (if ’trash’ option is set, otherwise delete). See "Trash directory" section below.

[count]DD or D[count]selector

removes the selected files.

Y, [count]yy or y[count]selector

yanks the selected files.

Y

same as yy.

p

will copy the yanked files to the current directory or move the files to the current directory if they were deleted with dd or :d[elete] or if the files were yanked from trash directory. See "Trash directory" section below.

P

moves the last yanked files. The advantage of using P instead of d followed by p is that P moves files only once. This isn’t important in case you’re moving files in the same file system where your home directory is, but using P to move files on some other file system (or file systems, in case you want to move files from fs1 to fs2 and your home is on fs3) can save your time.

al

puts symbolic links with absolute paths.

rl

puts symbolic links with relative paths.

t

select or unselect (tag) the current file.

u

undo last change.

Ctrl-R

redo last change.

v

enter visual mode.

V

enter visual mode.

[count]Ctrl-A

increment first number in file name by count (1 by default).

[count]Ctrl-X

decrement first number in file name by count (1 by default).

ZQ

same as :quit!

ZZ

same as :quit

.

repeat last command line command (not normal mode command) of this session (does nothing right after startup or :restart command). The command doesn’t depend on command-line history and can be used with completely disabled history.

(

goto previous group. Groups are defined by primary sorting key. For name and iname members of each group have same first letter, for all other sorting keys vifm uses size, uid, ...

)

goto next group. See ( key description above.

Using Count

You can use count with commands like yy.
[count]yy

yank count files starting from current cursor position downward.

Or you can use count with motions passed to y, d or D.
d[count]j

delete (count + 1) files starting from current cursor position upward.

Registers

vifm supports multiple registers for temporary storing list of yanked or deleted files.

Registers should be specified with hitting double quite key followed by a register name. Count is specified after register name. By default commands use unnamed register, which has double quote as its name.

Though all commands accept registers, most of commands ignores them (for example H or Ctrl-U). Other commands can fill register or append new files to it.

Presently vifm supports ", _, a-z and A-Z characters as register names.

As mentioned above " is unnamed register and has special meaning of the default register. Every time when you use named registers (a-z and A-Z) unnamed register is updated to contain same list of files as the last used register.

_ is black hole register. It can be used for writing, but its list is always empty.

Registers with names from a to z and from A to Z are named ones. Lowercase registers are cleared before adding new files, while uppercase aren’t and should be used to append new files to the existing file list of appropriate lowercase register (A for a, B for b, ...).

Registers can be changed on :empty command if they contain files under trash directory (see "Trash directory" section below).

Registers do not contain one file more than once.

Example:

  "a2yy

will put names of two files to register a (and to the unnamed register),

  "Ad

will remove one file and append its name to register a (and to the unnamed register),

  p or "ap or "Ap

will insert previously yanked and deleted files into current directory.

Selectors

y, d, D, !, gu and gU commands accept selectors. You can combine them
with any of selectors below to quickly remove or yank several files.

Most of selectors are like vi motions: j, k, gg, G, H, L, M, %, f, F, ;, comma, ’, ^, 0 and $. But there are some additional ones.

a

all files in current view.

s

selected files.

S

all files except selected.

Examples:

 dj − delete file under cursor and one below.
 d2j − delete file under cursor and two below.
 y6gg − yank all files from cursor position to 6th file in the list.

When you pass a count to whole command and its selector they are multiplied. So:

 2d2j − delete file under cursor and four below.
 2dj − delete file under cursor and two below.
 2y6gg − yank all files from cursor position to 12th file in the list.

Visual Mode

In visual mode work almost all normal mode keys, but they do not accept selectors.

Enter

save selection and go back to normal mode.

gv

restore previous visual selection.

v

leave visual mode.

V

leave visual mode.

:

enter command line mode. When you leave it selection will be cleared.

o

switch active selection bound.

O

switch active selection bound.

gu, u

make names of selected files lowercase.

gU, U

make names of selected files uppercase.

View Mode

This mode tries to imitate the less program. List of builtin shortcuts can be found below. Shortcuts can be customized using :qmap, :qnoremap and :qunmap command-line commands.
Shift-Tab, Tab, q, Q, ZZ

go back to normal mode.

[count]e, [count]Ctrl-E, [count]j, [count]Ctrl-N, [count]Enter

forward one line (or [count] lines).

[count]y, [count]Ctrl-Y, [count]k, [count]Ctrl-K, [count]Ctrl-P

backward one line (or [count] lines).

[count]f, [count]Ctrl-F, [count]Ctrl-V, [count]Space Bar

forward one window (or [count] lines).

[count]b, [count]Ctrl-B, [count]Alt-V

backward one window (or [count] lines).

[count]z

forward one window (and set window to [count]).

[count]w

backward one window (and set window to [count]).

[count]Alt-Space

forward one window, but don’t stop at end-of-file.

[count]d, [count]Ctrl-D

forward one half-window (and set half-window to [count]).

[count]u, [count]Ctrl-U

backward one half-window (and set half-window to [count]).

r, Ctrl-R, Ctrl-L

repaint screen.

R

reload view preserving scroll position.

[count]/pattern

search forward for ([count]-th) matching line.

[count]?pattern

search backward for ([count]-th) matching line.

[count]n

repeat previous search (for [count]-th occurrence).

[count]N

repeat previous search in reverse direction.

[count]g, [count]<, [count]Alt-<

go to first line in file (or line [count]).

[count]G, [count]>, [count]Alt->

go to last line in file (or line [count]).

[count]p, [count]%

go to beginning of file (or N percent into file).

v

edit the current file with vim.

Ctrl-W H

move the pane to the far left.

Ctrl-W J

move the pane to the very bottom.

Ctrl-W K

move the pane to the very top.

Ctrl-W L

move the pane to the far right.

Ctrl-W h

switch to left pane.

Ctrl-W j

switch to pane below.

Ctrl-W k

switch to pane above.

Ctrl-W l

switch to right pane.

Ctrl-W b

switch to bottom-right window.

Ctrl-W t

switch to top-left window.

Ctrl-W p

switch to previous window.

Ctrl-W w

switch to other pane.

Ctrl-W o

leave only one pane.

Ctrl-W s

split window horizontally.

Ctrl-W v

split window vertically.

Ctrl-W x

exchange panes.

Ctrl-W +

increase size of the view.

Ctrl-W −

decrease size of the view.

Ctrl-W <

increase size of the view.

Ctrl-W >

decrease size of the view.

Ctrl-W |

maximize current view.

Ctrl-W _

maximize current view.

Ctrl-W =

make size of two views equal.

In general, all "Ctrl-W x" keys above work the same was as in Normal mode. Active mode is automatically changed on navigating among windows. When less-like mode activated on file preview is left using one by "Ctrl-W x" keys, its state is stored until another file is showed using preview (it’s possible to leave the mode, hide preview pane, do something else, then get back to the file and show preview pane again with previously stored state in it).

Command line Mode

This keys apply to all submodes of the command line mode: command, prompt and search.

Down, Up, Left, Right, Home, End and Delete are extended keys and they are not available if vifm is compiled with −−disable−extended−keys option.
Esc, Ctrl-C

leave command line mode, cancels input. Cancelled input is saved into appropriate history and can be recalled later.

Ctrl-M, Enter

execute command and leave command line mode.

Ctrl-I, Tab

complete command or its argument.

Shift-Tab

complete in reverse order.

Ctrl-_

stop completion and return original input.

Ctrl-K

remove characters from cursor position till the end of line.

Ctrl-U

remove characters from cursor position till the beginning of line.

Ctrl-H, Backspace

remove character before the cursor.

Ctrl-D, Delete

remove character under the cursor.

Ctrl-B, Left

move cursor to the left.

Ctrl-F, Right

move cursor to the right.

Ctrl-A, Home

go to line beginning.

Ctrl-E, End

go to line end

Alt-B

go to the beginning of previous word.

Alt-F

go to the end of next word.

Ctrl-W

remove characters from cursor position till the beginning of previous word.

Alt-D

remove characters from cursor position till the beginning of next word.

Ctrl-T

swap the order of current and previous character and move cursor forward or, if cursor past the end of line, swap the order of two last characters in the line.

Alt-.

insert last part of previous command to current cursor position. Each next call will insert last part of older command.

Ctrl-G

edit command-line content in external editor. See "Command line editing" section for details.

Ctrl-N

recall more recent command-line from history.

Ctrl-P

recall older command-line from history.

Up

recall more recent command-line from history, that begins as the current command-line.

Down

recall older command-line from history, that begins as the current command-line.

Command line editing

vifm provides a facility to edit several kinds of data, that is usually edited in command-line mode, in external editor (using command specified by ´vicmd’ or ’vixcmd’ option). This has at least two advantages over built-in command-line mode:
− one can use full power of Vim to edit text;
− finding and reusing history entries becomes possible.

The facility is supported by four input submodes of the command-line:
− command;
− forward search;
− backward search;
− file rename (see description of cw and cW normal mode keys).

Editing command-line using external editor is activated by the c_CTRL-G shortcut. It’s also possible to do almost the same from Normal and Visual modes using q:, q/ and q? commands.

Temporary file created for the purpose of editing the line has the following structure:

1.

First line, which is either empty or contains text already entered in command-line.

2.

2nd and all other lines with history items starting with the most recent one. Altering this lines in any way won’t change history items stored by vifm.

After editing application is finished the first line of the file is taken as the result of operation, when the application returns zero exit code. If the application returns an error (see :cquit command in Vim), all the edits made to the file are ignored, but the initial value of the first line is saved in appropriate history.

Commands

Commands are executed with :command_name<Return>

Commented out lines should start with the double quote symbol, which may be preceded by whitespace characters.

´|’ can be used to separate commands, so you can give multiple commands in one line. If you want to use ’|’ in an argument, precede it with ’\’.

These commands see ’|’ as part of their arguments even when it’s escaped:

:[range]!
:cmap
:cnoremap
:command
:filetype
:fileviewer
:filextype
:map
:mmap
:mnoremap
:nmap
:nnoremap
:noremap
:normal
:qmap
:qnoremap
:vmap
:vnoremap
:windo
:winrun

To be able to use another command after one of these, wrap it with the :execute command. An example:

    if filetype(’.’) == ’reg’ | execute ’!!echo regular file’ | endif

:[count]
:number

move to the file number.
:12 would move to the 12th file in the list.
:0 move to the top of the list.
:$ move to the bottom of the list.

:[count]command

The only builtin :[count]command are :[count]d[elete] and :[count]y[ank].

:d3

would delete three files starting at the current file position moving down.

:3d

would delete one file at the third line in the list.

:command [args]
:[range]!program

will execute the program in a shell

:[range]!command &

will run the process in the background using vifm’s means.

Programs that write to stdout like ls will create an error message showing partial output of the command.

Take note of the space before ampersand symbol, if you omit it, command will be run in the background using job control of your shell.

Accepts macros.
:[range]!! <program>

is the same as :! but will pause the screen before returning to Vifm.

:!!

will execute the last command.

:[range]alink[!?]

creates absolute symbolic links of files in directory of other view. With "?" vifm will open vi to edit filenames. "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]alink[!] path

creates absolute symbolic links of files in directory specified with the path (absolute or relative to directory of other view). "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]alink[!] name1 name2...

creates absolute symbolic links of files in directory of other view giving each next link a corresponding name from the argument list. "!" forces overwrite.

:apropos manpage

will create a menu of items returned by the apropos command. Selecting an item in the menu will open the corresponding manpage. By default the command relies on the external "apropos" utility, which can be customized by altering value of the ’aproposprg’ option.

:apropos

repeats last :apropos command.

:cd or :cd ~ or :cd $HOME

change to your home directory.

:cd −

go to previous directory.

:cd ~/dir

change directory to ~/dir.

:cd /curr/dir /other/dir

change directory of the current pane to /curr/dir and directory of the other pane to /other/dir. When using relative paths vifm assumes that both of them are relative to current directory of current view. Command will not fail if one of directories is invalid. Accepts macros.

:cd! /dir

same as :cd /dir /dir.

:c[hange]

create a menu window to alter a files properties.

:[range]chmod

shows file attributes (permission on *nix and properties on Windows) change dialog.

:[range]chmod[!] arg...

only for *nix
changes permissions for files. See ’man chmod’ for arg format. "!" means set permissions recursively.

:[range]chown

only for *nix
same as co key in normal mode.

:[range]chown [user][:][group]

only for *nix
changes owner and/or group of files. Operates on directories recursively.

:[range]clone[!?]

clones files in current directory. With "?" vifm will open vi to edit filenames. "!" forces overwrite. Macros are expanded.

:[range]clone[!] path

clones files to directory specified with the path (absolute or relative to current directory). "!" forces overwrite. Macros are expanded.

:[range]clone[!] name1 name2...

clones files in current directory giving each next clone a corresponding name from the argument list. "!" forces overwrite. Macros are expanded.

:colo[rscheme]?

prints current color scheme name in the status bar.

:colo[rscheme]

gives a menu with a list of available color schemes. You can choose default color scheme here. It will be used for view if no DIRECTORY in colorscheme file fits current path. It’s also used to set border color (except view titles) and colors in the menus and dialogs.

:colo[rscheme] color_scheme_name

changes default color scheme to color_scheme_name.

:colo[rscheme] color_scheme_name directory

associates directory with the color scheme. The directory argument can be both absolute or relative path when :colorscheme command is executed from command line, but mandatory should be an absolute path when the command is executed in scripts loaded at startup (until vifm is completely loaded).

:comc[lear]

removes all user defined commands.

:com[mand]

gives a menu of user commands.

:com[mand] beginning

shows user defined commands that start with the beginning.

:com[mand] name action

sets a new user command.
Trying to use a reserved command name will result in an error message.
Use :com[mand]! to overwrite a previously set command.
Unlike vim user commands do not have to start with a capital letter. User commands are run in a shell by default. To run a command in the background you must set it as a background command with & at the end of the commands action (:com rm rm %f &). Command name cannot contain numbers or special symbols (except ’?’ and ’!’).

:com[mand] name /pattern

will set search pattern.

:com[mand] name filter pattern

will set file name filter.

:com[mand] cmd :commands

will set kind of alias for internal command (like in a shell). Will pass range given to alias to an aliased command, so running :%cp after
:command cp :copy %a
equals
:%copy

:[range]co[py][!?][ &]

copies files to directory of other view. With "?" vifm will open vi to edit filenames. "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]co[py][!] path[ &]

copies files to directory specified with the path (absolute or relative to directory of other view). "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]co[py][!] name1 name2...[ &]

copies files to directory of other view giving each next file a corresponding name from the argument list. "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]d[elete][!][ &]

delete selected file or files. "!" means completely remove file.

:[range]d[elete][!] [reg] [count][ &]

will delete files to the reg register. "!" means completely remove file.

:delc[ommand] command_name

will remove the command_name user command.

:delm[arks]!

will delete all marks.

:delm[arks] marks ...

will delete specified marks, each argument is treated as a set of marks.

:di[splay]

popup menu with registers content.

:di[splay] list ...

display the contents of the numbered and named registers that are mentioned in list (for example "az to display "", "a and "z content).

:dirs

display directory stack.

:ec[ho] [<expr>...]

evaluates each argument as an expression and outputs them separated by a space. See help on :let command for a definition of <expr>.

:[range]e[dit] [file...]

will load the selected or passed file or files into vi. Accepts macros.

:el[se]

executes commands until next matching :endif if they previously were not being executed. See also help on :if and :endif commands.

:empty

will permanently remove ’rm −fr’ files from trash directory. It will also remove all operations from undolist that have no sense after :empty and remove all records about files in trash directory from all registers. See "Trash directory" section below.

:en[dif]

ends conditional block. See also help on :if and :else commands.

:exe[cute] [<expr>...]

evaluates each argument as an expression and joins results separated by a space to get a single string, which is then executed as a command-line command. See help on :let command for a definition of <expr>.

:exi[t][!]

same as :quit.

:f[ile]

popup menu of programs set for the file type of the current file. Add ’ &’ at the end of command to run program in background.

:f[ile] arg

run associated command that begins with the arg without opening menu.

:filet[ype] pat1,pat2,... [{descr}]def_prog[ &],[{descr}]prog2[ &],...

will associate given program list to each of the patterns. Associated program (command) is used by handlers of l and Enter keys (and also in the :file menu). If you need to insert comma into command just double it (",,"). Space followed by an ampersand as two last characters of a command means running of the command in the background. Optional description can be given to each command to ease understanding of what command will do in the :file menu. Vifm will try the rest of the programs for an association when the default isn’t found. When program entry doesn’t contain any of vifm macros, name of current file is appended as if program entry ended with %c macro. On Windows path to executables containing spaces can (and should be for correct work with such paths) be double quoted. See "Globs" section below for pattern definition. See also "Automatic FUSE mounts" section below. Example for zip archives and several actions:

filetype *.zip,*.jar,*.war,*.ear
\ {Mount with fuse-zip}
\ FUSE_MOUNT|fuse-zip %SOURCE_FILE %DESTINATION_DIR,
\ {View contents}
\ zip -sf %c | less,
\ {Extract here}
\ tar -xf %c,

:filex[type] pat1,pat2,... [{ description }] def_program,program2,...

same as :filetype, but vifm will ignore this command if it’s not running in X.
In X :filextype is equal to :filetype. See "Globs" section below for pattern
definition. See also "Automatic FUSE mounts" section below.

:filev[iewer] pat1,pat2,... command

will associate given command as a viewer to each of the patterns. Viewer is a
command which output is captured and showed in the second pane of vifm after
running :view command. When the command doesn’t contain any of vifm macros,
name of current file is appended as if command ended with %c macro. See
"Globs" section below for pattern definition. Example for zip archives:

fileviewer *.zip,*.jar,*.war,*.ear zip -sf %c

:filter[!] regular_expression_pattern

:filter[!] /regular_expression_pattern/
will filter all the files out of the directory listing that match the regular
expression. Using second variant you can use the bar (’|’) symbol without
escaping. Empty regular expression (specified by //, "" or ’’) means using of
the last search pattern. Use ’!’ to control state of filter inversion after
updating filter value (also see ’cpoptions’ description). Filter is matched
case sensitively on *nix and case insensitively on Windows.
:filter /.o$ would filter all files ending in .o from the filelist.
Note: vifm uses extended regular expressions.

:filter

reset filter (set it to empty string) and show all files.

:filter!

same as :invert.

:filter?

show current value of name and auto filters.

:[range]fin[d] pattern

will show results of find command in the menu. Searches among selected files if
any. Accepts macros. By default the command relies on the external "find"
utility, which can be customized by altering value of the ’findprg’ option.

:[range]fin[d] −opt...

same as :find above, but user defines all find arguments. Searches among
selected files if any.

:[range]fin[d] path −opt...

same as :find above, but user defines all find arguments. Ignores selection and
range.

:[range]fin[d]

repeats last :find command.

:fini[sh]

Stop sourcing a script. Can only be used in a vifm script file. This is a quick
way to skip the rest of the file.

:[range]gr[ep][!] pattern

will show results of grep command in the menu. Add "!" to request inversion of
search (look for lines that do not match pattern). Searches among selected
files if any and no range given. Ignores binary files by default. By default
the command relies on the external "grep" utility, which can be customized by
altering value of the ’grepprg’ option.

:[range]gr[ep][!] −opt...

same as :grep above, but user defines all find arguments, which are not escaped.
Searches among selected files if any.

:[range]gr[ep][!]

repeats last :grep command. "!" of this command inverts "!" in repeated
command.

:h[elp]

show the help file.

:h[elp] argument

is the same as using ’:h argument’ in vim. Use vifm−<something> to get help
on vifm (tab completion works). This form of the command doesn’t work when
´vimhelp’ option is off.

:hi[ghlight]

will show information about all highlight groups in the current directory.

:hi[ghlight] group−name

will show information on given highlight group of the default color scheme.

:hi[ghlight] group−name cterm=style | ctermfg=color | ctermbg=color

sets style (cterm), foreground (ctermfg) or/and background (ctermbg) parameters
of highlight groups of the current default color scheme.

Available style values (some of them can be combined):
− bold
− underline
− reverse or inverse
− standout
− none

Available group-name values:
− Win − color of all windows (views, dialogs, menus)
− Border − color of vertical parts of the border
− TopLineSel − top line color of the current pane
− TopLine − top line color of the other pane
− CmdLine − the command line/status bar color
− ErrorMsg − color of error messages in the status bar
− StatusLine − color of the line above the status bar
− WildMenu − color of the wild menu items
− CurrLine − line at cursor position in the view
− Selected − color of selected files
− Directory − color of directories
− Link − color of symbolic links in the views
− BrokenLink − color of broken symbolic links
− Socket − color of sockets
− Device − color of block and character devices
− Executable − color of executable files
− Fifo − color of fifo pipes

Available colors:
− −1 or default or none − default or transparent
− black
− red
− green
− yellow
− blue
− magenta
− cyan
− white

Light versions of colors are regular colors with bold attribute set. So order
of arguments of :highlight command is important and it’s better to put "cterm"
in front of others to prevent it from overwriting attributes set by "ctermfg" or
"ctermbg" arguments.

Since there are two colors and only one bold attribute it affects both colors
when "reverse" attribute is used when running vifm in terminal emulator. While
linux native console can handle boldness of foreground and background colors
independently, which is for consistency with terminal emulators accessible from
vifm only implicitly by using light versions of colors.

Here is the hierarchy of highlight groups, which you need to know for using
transparency:
StatusLine
WildMenu
Border
CmdLine
ErrorMsg
Win
Directory
Link
BrokenLink
Socket
Device
Fifo
Executable
Selected
CurrLine
TopLine
TopLineSel

"none" means default terminal color for highlight groups at the first level of
the hierarchy and transparency for all others.
:his[tory]

creates a popup menu of directories visited.

:his[tory] x

x can be:
d[ir] or . show directory history.
c[md] or : show command line history.
s[earch] or / show search history and search forward on l key.
f[search] or / show search history and search forward on l key.
b[search] or ? show search history and search backward on l key.
i[nput] or @ show prompt history (e.g. on one file renaming).
fi[lter] or = show filter history (see description of the "=" normal mode command).

:if {expr1}

starts conditional block. Commands are executed until next matching :else of
:endif command if {expr1} evaluates to non-zero, otherwise they are ignored.
See also help on :else and :endif commands.

:invert [f]

invert file name filter.

:invert? [f]

show current filter state.

:invert s

invert selection.

:invert o

invert sorting order of the primary sorting key.

:invert? o

show sorting order of the primary sorting key.

:jobs

shows menu of current backgrounded processes.

:let $ENV_VAR = <expr>

sets environment variable. Warning: setting environment variable to an empty
string on Windows removes it.

:let $ENV_VAR .= <expr>

append value to environment variable.

Where <expr> could be a single-quoted string, double-quoted string, an environment variable, function call or a concatanation of any of them in any order using the ’.’ operator. Any whitespace is ignored.
:locate filename

uses the locate command to create a menu of filenames
Selecting a file from the menu will reload the current file list in vifm
to show the selected file. By default the command relies on the external
"locate" utility (it’s assumed that its database is already built), which can be
customized by altering value of the ’locateprg’ option.

:locate

repeats last :locate command.

:[range]ma[rk][?] x [/full/path] [filename]

Set mark x (a−zA−Z0−9) at /full/path and filename. By default current directory
is being used. If no filename was given and /full/path is current directory
then last file in [range] is used. Using of macros is allowed. Question mark
will stop command from overwriting existing marks.

:marks

create a popup menu of bookmarks.

:marks list ...

display the contents of the marks that are mentioned in list.

:mes[sages]

shows previously given messages (up to 50).

:mkdir[!] dir ...

creates directories with given names. "!" means make parent directories as
needed. Macros are expanded.

:[range]m[ove][!?][ &]

moves files to directory of other view. With "?" vifm will open vi to edit
filenames. "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]m[ove][!] path[ &]

moves files to directory specified with the path (absolute or relative to
directory of other view). "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]m[ove][!] name1 name2...[ &]

moves files to directory of other view giving each next file a corresponding
name from the argument list. "!" forces overwrite.

:noh[lsearch]

clear selection in current pane.

:norm[al][!] commands

executes normal mode commands. If "!" is used, mappings will not be used. If
the last command is unfinished it will be aborted as if <esc> or <c-c> was
typed. A ":" should be completed as well. Commands can’t start with a space,
so put a count of 1 (one) before it.

:on[ly]

changes the window to show only the current file directory.

:popd

remove pane directories from stack.

:pushd[!] /curr/dir [/other/dir]

add pane directories to stack and process arguments like :cd command.

:pushd

exchanges the top two items of the directory stack.

:pw[d]

show the present working directory.

:q[uit][!]

will exit vifm (add ! if you don’t want to save changes or check if there are
any of backgrounded commands still running).

:[range]y[ank] [reg] [count]

will yank files to the reg register.

:ls

lists windows of active terminal multiplexer (only when terminal multiplexer is

used). This is achieved by issuing proper command for active terminal
multiplexer, thus the list is not handled by vifm.

:reg[isters]

popup menu with registers content.

:reg[isters] list ...

display the contents of the numbered and named registers that are mentioned in
list (for example "az to display "", "a and "z content).

:[range]rename[!]

rename files using vi to edit names. ! means go recursively through directories.

:[range]rename name1 name2...

rename each of selected files to a corresponding name.

:restart

will free a lot of things (histories, commands, etc.), reread vifminfo and
vifmrc files and run startup commands passed in the argument list, thus losing
all unsaved changes (e.g. recent history or keys mapped in current session).

:[range]restore

will restore file from trash directory, doesn’t work in any other directory.
See "Trash directory" section below.

:[range]rlink[!?]

creates relative symbolic links of files in directory of other view. With "?"
vifm will open vi to edit filenames. "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]rlink[!] path

creates relative symbolic links of files in directory specified with the path
(absolute or relative to directory of other view). "!" forces overwrite.

:[range]rlink[!] name1 name2...

creates relative symbolic links of files in directory of other view giving each
next link a corresponding name from the argument list. "!" forces overwrite.

:screen

toggles whether to use the terminal multiplexer or not.
A terminal multiplexer uses pseudo terminals to allow multiple windows to be
used in the console or in a single xterm. Starting vifm from terminal
multiplexer with appropriate support turned on will cause vifm to open a new
terminal multiplexer window for each new file edited or program launched from
vifm.
This requires screen version 3.9.9 or newer for the screen −X argument or tmux
(version or newer 1.8 is recommented).

:screen?

shows whether integration with terminal multiplexers is enabled.

Note: the command is called screen for historical reasons (when tmux wasn’t yet
supported) and might be changed in future releases, or get an alias.

:se[t]

shows all options that differ from their default value.

:se[t] all

shows all options.

:se[t] opt1=val1 opt2=’val2’ opt3="val3" ...

will set options to given values.
You can use following syntax:
− for all options − option, option? and option&
− for boolean options − nooption, invoption and option!
− for integer options − option=x, option+=x and option−=x
− for string options − option=x
− for string list options − option=x, option+=x and option−=x
− for enumeration options − option=x, option+=x and option−=x
− for enumeration options − option=x
− for set options − option=x, option+=x and option−=x
− for charset options − option=x, option+=x and option−=x

the meaning:
− option − turn option on (for boolean) or print its value (for all others)
− nooption − turn option off
− invoption − invert option state
− option! − invert option state
− option? − print option value
− option& − reset option to its default value
− option=x or option:x − set option to x
− option+=x − add x to option
− option−=x − remove (or subtract) x from option

Option name can be prepended and appended by any number of whitespace
characters.

:sh[ell]

will start a shell.

:sor[t]

creates a popup menu of different sorting methods, when one can select primary
sorting key. When ’viewcolumns’ options is empty and ’lsview’ is off, changing
primary sorting key will also affect view look (in particular the second column
of the view will be changed).

:so[urce] file

reads command-line commands from the file.

:sp[lit]

switch to a two window horizontal view.

:sp[lit]!

toggles window horizontal splitting.

:sp[lit] path

splits the window horizontally to show both file directories. And changes other
pane to path (absolute or relative to current directory of active pane).

:[range]s[ubstitite]/pattern/string/[flags]

for each file in range replace a match of pattern with string.

String can contain \0...\9 to link to capture groups (\0 − all match, \1 −
first group, etc.).

Available flags:

i − ignore case (the ’ignorecase’ and ’smartcase’ options are not used)

I − don’t ignore case (the ’ignorecase’ and ’smartcase’ options are not used)

g − substitute all matches in each file name (each g toggles this)

:[range]s[ubstitute]//string/[flags]

will use previous pattern.

:[range]s[ubstitute]

will repeat previous substitution command.

:sync [relative path]

change the other panel to the current panel directory or to some path relative
to the current directory. Using macros is allowed.

:sync!

change the other panel to the current panel directory and synchronize cursor
position.

:touch file...

will create files. Aborts on errors and won’t update time of existing files.
Macros are expanded.

:[range]tr/pattern/string/

for each file in range transliterate the characters which appear in pattern to
the corresponding character in string. When string is shorter than pattern,
it’s padded with its last character.

String can contain ...9 to link to capture groups (0 − all match, 1 − first
group, etc.).
:undol[ist]

show list of latest changes. Add ! to see commands.

:unl[et][!] $ENV_VAR1 $ENV_VAR2 ...

remove environment variables. Add ! to omit displaying of warnings about
nonexistent variables.

:ve[rsion]

show menu with version information.

:vifm

same as :version.

:vie[w]

toggle on and off the quick file view.

:vie[w]!

turns on quick file view if it’s off.

:volumes

only for MS-Windows
will popup menu with volume list. Hitting l (or Enter) key will open
appropriate volume in the current pane.

:vs[plit]

switch to a two window vertical view.

:vs[plit]!

toggles window vertical splitting.

:vs[plit] path

splits the window vertically to show both file directories. And changes other
pane to path (absolute or relative to current directory of active pane).

:windo [command...]

Execute command for each pane (same as :winrun % command).

:winrun type [command...]

Execute command for pane(s), which is determined by type argument:
− ^ − top-left pane
− $ − bottom-right pane
− % − all panes
− . − current pane
− , − other pane

:w[rite]

write vifminfo file (add ! to force write even if settings weren’t changed).

:wq[!]

same as :quit, but ! only disables check of backgrounded commands.

:x[it][!]

will exit Vifm (add ! if you don’t want to save changes).

:map lhs rhs

map lhs key sequence to rhs in normal and visual modes.

:map! lhs rhs

map lhs key sequence to rhs in command line mode.

:cm[ap] lhs rhs

map lhs to rhs in command line mode.

:mm[ap] lhs rhs

map lhs to rhs in menu mode.

:nm[ap] lhs rhs

map lhs to rhs in normal mode.

:qm[ap] lhs rhs

map lhs to rhs in view mode.

:vm[ap] lhs rhs

map lhs to rhs in visual mode.

:cm[ap]

lists all maps in command line mode.

:mm[ap]

lists all maps in menu mode.

:nm[ap]

lists all maps in normal mode.

:qm[ap]

lists all maps in view mode.

:vm[ap]

lists all maps in visual mode.

:cm[ap] beginning

lists all maps in command line mode that start with the beginning.

:mm[ap] beginning

lists all maps in menu mode that start with the beginning.

:nm[ap] beginning

lists all maps in normal mode that start with the beginning.

:qm[ap] beginning

lists all maps in view mode that start with the beginning.

:vm[ap] beginning

lists all maps in visual mode that start with the beginning.

:no[remap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for normal and visual modes, but disallow
mapping of rhs.

:no[remap]! lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for command line mode, but disallow mapping of
rhs.

:cno[remap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for command line mode, but disallow mapping of
rhs.

:mn[oremap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for menu mode, but disallow mapping of rhs.

:nn[oremap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for normal mode, but disallow mapping of rhs.

:qn[oremap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for view mode, but disallow mapping of rhs.

:vn[oremap] lhs rhs

map the key sequence lhs to {rhs} for visual mode, but disallow mapping of rhs.

:unm[ap] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from normal and visual modes.

:unm[ap]! lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from command line mode.

:cu[nmap] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from command line mode.

:mu[nmap] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from menu mode.

:nun[map] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from normal mode.

:qun[map] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from view mode.

:vu[nmap] lhs

remove the mapping of lhs from visual mode.

Ranges

The ranges implemented include:
2,3 − from second to third file in the list (including it)
% − the entire directory.
. − the current position in the filelist.
$ − the end of the filelist.
’t − the mark position t.

Examples:

  :%delete

would delete all files in the directory.

  :2,4delete

would delete the files in the list positions 2 through 4.

  :.,$delete

would delete the files from the current position to the end of the filelist.

  :3delete4

would delete the files in the list positions 3, 4, 5, 6.

If a backward range is given :4,2delete − an query message is given and user can chose what to do next.

The builtin commands that accept a range are :d[elete] and :y[ank].

Command macros

The command macros may be used in user commands.

%a

User arguments. When user arguments contain macros, they are expanded before preforming substitution of %a.

%c %"c

The current file under the cursor.

%C %"C

The current file under the cursor in the other directory.

%f %"f

All of the selected files.

%F %"F

All of the selected files in the other directory list.

%b %"b

Same as %f %F.

%d %"d

Full path to current directory.

%D %"D

Full path to other file list directory.

%rx %"rx

Full paths to files in the register {x}. In case of invalid symbol in place of {x}, it’s processed with the rest of the line and default register is used.

%m

Show command output in a menu.

%M

Same as %m, but l (or Enter) key is handled like for :locate and :find commands.

%S

Show command output in the status bar.

%s

Execute command in split window of active terminal multiplexer (ignored if not running inside one).

%i

Completely ignore command output.

Use %% if you need to put a percent sign in your command.

Note that %m, %M, %s, %S and %i macros are mutually exclusive. Only the last one of them in the command will take effect.

You can use filename modifiers after %c, %C, %f, %F, %b, %d and %D macros. Supported modifiers are:

:p − full path

:u − UNC name of path (e.g. "\\server" in "\\server\share"), Windows only. Expands to current computer name for not UNC paths.

:~ − relative to the home directory

:. − relative to current directory

:h − head of the filename

:t − tail of the filename

:r − root of the filename (without last extension)

:e − extension of the filename (last one)

:s?pat?sub? − substitute the first occurrence of pat with sub. You can use any character for ’?’, but it must not occur in pat or sub.

:gs?pat?sub? − like :s, but substitutes all occurrences of pat with sub.

See ’:h filename−modifiers’ in Vim’s documentation for the detailed description.

Using %x means expand corresponding macro escaping all characters that have special meaning. And %"x means using of double quotes and escape only backslash and double quote characters, which is more useful on Windows systems.

Position and quantity (if there is any) of %m, %M, %S or %s macros in the command is unimportant. All their occurrences will be removed from the resulting command.

%c and %f macros are expanded to file names only, when %C and %F are expanded to full paths. %f and %F follow this in %b too.

:com move mv %f %D

would set the :move command to move all of the files selected in the current directory to the other directory.

The %a macro will substitute any arguments given in a command into the
command. All arguments are considered optional. ":com lsl !!ls −l %a"
will set the lsl command to execute ls −l with or without an argument.
:lsl<Return>

will list the directory contents of the current directory.

:lsl filename<Return>

will list only the given filename.

The macros can also be used in directly executing commands. ":!mv %f
%D" would move the current directory selected files to the other
directory.
Appending & to the end of a command will cause it to be executed in the
background.Typically you want to run two kinds of external commands in
thebackground:

− GUI applications that doesn’t fork thus block vifm (:!sxiv %f &);
− console tools that do not work with terminal (:!mv %f %D &).

You don’t want to run terminal commands, which require terminal input
oroutput something because they will mess up vifm’s TUI. Anyway, if you
did runsuch a command, you can use Ctrl-L key to update vifm’s TUI.
Rewriting the example command with macros given above with
backgrounding:

 :!mv %f %D &

Note that %m, %M, %s, %S and %i macros have bigger priority than &. So command containing at least one of them can’t be backgrounded and " &" at the end will be just silently ignored.

Command backgrounding

Copy and move operation can take a lot of time to proceed. That’s why vifm supports backgrounding of this two operations. To run :copy, :move or :delete command in the background just add " &" at the end of a command.

For each background operation a new thread will be created. Currently job cannot be stopped or paused.

You can see if command is still running in the :jobs menu. Backgrounded commands have progress instead of process id at the line beginning.

Background operations cannot be undone.

Globs

:filetype, :filextype and :fileviewer commands support globs to match file names. Here is a short overview of globs and some important points that one needs to know about them.

Only names of files are matched by the globs, not full paths. E.g.

 :filetype Makefile make %c

will match files with name "Makefile" regardless whether it’s in root or home directory.

*, ?, [ and ] are treated as special symbols in the pattern. E.g.

 :filetype * less %c

matches all files. One can use character classes for escaping, so

 :filetype [*] less %c

matches only one file name, the one which contains only asterisk symbol.

* means any number of any characters (possibly an empty substring), with one exception: asterisk at the pattern beginning doesn’t match dot in the first position. E.g.

 :fileviewer *.zip,*.jar zip −sf %c

associates using of zip program to preview all files with zip or jar extensions as listing of their content.

? means any character at this position. E.g.

 :fileviewer ?.out file %c

calls file tool for all files which has exactly one character before their extension (e.g. a.out, b.out).

Square brackets designate character class, which means that whole character class matches against any of characters listed in it. For example

 :fileviewer *.[ch] highlight −O xterm256 −s dante −−syntax c %c

makes vifm call highlight program to colorize source and header files in C language for a 256-color terminal. Equal command would be

 :fileviewer *.c,*.h highlight −O xterm256 −s dante −−syntax c %c

Inside square brackets ^ or ! can be used for symbol class negotiation and the − symbol to set a range. ^ and ! should appear right after the opening square bracket. For example

 :filetype *.[!d]/ inspect_dir

associates inspect_dir as additional handler for all directories that have one character extension unless it’s "d" letter. And

 :filetype [0-9].jpg sxiv

associates sxiv picture viewer only for JPEG-files that contain single digit in their name.

:set options

Local options

These are kind of options that are local to a specific view. So you can set ascending sorting order for left pane and descending order for right pane.

aproposprg

type: string
default: "apropos %a"
Specifies format for an external command to be invoked by the :apropos command. The format supports expanding of macros, specific for a particular *prg option, and %% sequence for inserting percent sign literally. This option should include the %a macro to specify placement of arguments passed to the :apropos command. If the macro is not used, it will be implicitly added after a space to the value of this option.

autochpos

type: boolean
default: true
When disabled vifm will set cursor to the first line in the view after :cd and :pushd commands instead of saved cursor position. Disabling this will also make vifm clear information about cursor position in the view history on :cd and :pushd commands (and on startup if autochpos is disabled in the vifmrc). l key in the :history . menu is treated like :cd command. This option affects bookmarks, file position will not preserved.

columns co

type: int
default: terminal width on startup
Terminal width in characters.

classify

type: string list
default: ":dir:/"
Specifies file name prefixes and suffixes depending on file types. The format is: [{prefix}]:{filetype}:[{suffix}]. Either {prefix} or {suffix} or both of them can be omitted (which is the default for all unspecified file types), this means empty {prefix} and/or {suffix}. {prefix} and {suffix} should consist exactly of one character. Elements are separated by commas. Neither prefixes nor suffixes are part of file names, so they don’t affect commands which operate on file names in any way. Comma (’,’) character should not be used. List of file type names can be found in the description of filetype() function.

confirm cf

type: boolean
default: true
Ask about permanent deletion of files (on D or :delete! command or on undo/redo operation).

cpoptions cpo

type: charset
default: "fst"
Contains a sequence of single-character flags. Each flag enables behaviour of older versions of vifm. Flags:
f − when included, running :filter command results in not inverted (matching files are filtered out) and :filter! in inverted (matching files are left) filter, when omitted, meaning of the exclamation mark changes to the opposite;
s − when included, yy, dd and DD normal mode commands act on selection, otherwise they operate on current file only;
t − when included, <tab> (thus <c-i>) behave as <space> and switch active pane, otherwise <tab> and <c-i> go forward in the view history.

dotdirs

type: set
default: nonrootparent
Controls displaying of dot directories. The following values are possible:
− rootparent − show "../" in root directory of file system
− nonrootparent − show "../" in non-root directories of file system
Note that empty directories will always contain "../" entry regardless of value of this option. "../" will disappear at the moment at least one file is created inside the directory.

fastrun

type: boolean
default: false
With this option turned on you can run partially entered commands with unambiguous beginning using :! (e.g. :!Te instead of :!Terminal or :!Te<tab>).

findprg

type: string
default: "find %s %a −print , -type d \( ! −readable -o ! -executable \) −prune"
Specifies format for an external command to be invoked by the :find command. The format supports expanding of macros, specific for a particular *prg option, and %% sequence for inserting percent sign literally. This option should include the %s macro to specify placement of list of paths to search in and the %a macro to specify placement of arguments passed to the :find command. If some of the macros are not used, they will be implicitly added after a space to the value of the option in the following order: %s, %a.

%s and %a macro can slightly change their meaning depending on :find command arguments. When the first argument points to an existing directory, %s is assigned all arguments and %a is left empty. Otherwise, %s is assigned a dot (".") meaning current directory or list of selected filenames if any. %a is assigned arguments when first argument starts with a dash ("−"), otherwise an escaped version of arguments, prepended by "−name" (on *nix) or "−iname" (on Windows) predicate.

followlinks

type: boolean
default: true
Follow links on l or Enter.

fusehome

type: string
default: "($TMPDIR | $TEMP | $TEMPDIR | $TMP)/vifm_FUSE/"
Directory to be used as a root dir for FUSE mounts. Value of the option can contain environment variables (in form "$envname"), which will be expanded (prepend it with a slash to prevent expansion). The value should expand to an absolute path.

If you change this option, vifm won’t remount anything. It affects future mounts only. See "Automatic FUSE mounts" section below for more information.

gdefault gd

type: boolean
default: false
When on, ’g’ flag is on for :substitute by default.

grepprg

type: string
default: "grep −n −H −I −r %i %a %s"
Specifies format for an external command to be invoked by the :grep command. The format supports expanding of macros, specific for a particular *prg option, and %% sequence for inserting percent sign literally. This option should include the %i macro to specify placement of "−v" string when inversion of results is requested, the %a macro to specify placement of arguments passed to the :grep command and the %s macro to specify placement of list of files to search in. If some of the macros are not used, they will be implicitly added after a space to the value of the ’grepprg’ option in the following order: %i, %a, %s.

Example of setup to use ack (http://beyondgrep.com/) instead of grep:

    set grepprg=ack\ −H\ −r\ %i\ %a\ %s

or The Silver Searcher (https://github.com/ggreer/the_silver_searcher):

    set grepprg=ag\ −−line-numbers\ %i\ %a\ %s

history hi

type: integer
default: 15
Maximum number of directories in the view history and lines in the prompt, command line and search histories.

hlsearch hls

type: bool
default: true
Highlight all matches of search pattern.

iec

type: boolean

default: false
Use KiB, MiB, ... instead of KB, MB, ...

ignorecase ic

type: boolean
default: false
Ignore case in search patterns (:substitute, / and ? commands) and characters after f and F commands. It doesn’t affect file filtering.

incsearch is

type: boolean
default: false
When this option is set, search will be performed starting from initial cursor position each time search pattern is changed.

laststatus ls

type: boolean
default: true
Controls if status bar is visible.

lines

type: int

default: terminal height on startup
Terminal height in lines.

locateprg

type: string
default: "locate %a"
Specifies format for an external command to be invoked by the :locate command. The format supports expanding of macros, specific for a particular *prg option, and %% sequence for inserting percent sign literally. This option should include the %a macro to specify placement of arguments passed to the :locate command. If the macro is not used, it will be implicitly added after a space to the value of this option.

lsview

type: boolean

default: false
type: local
When this option is set, directory view will be displayed in multiple columns with filenames similar to output of ’ls −x’ command. See ls-like view section below for format description.

rulerformat ruf

type: string
default: "%=%l−%S "
Determines the content of the ruler. Its width is 13 characters and it’s right aligned. Following macros are supported:
%l − file number
%L − total number of files in view (including filtered)
%− − number of filtered files
%S − number of showed files
%= − separation point between left and right align items
%% − percent sign

Percent sign can be followed by optional minimum field width. Add ’−’ before minimum field width if you want field to be right aligned. Example:

 set rulerformat="%=%2l−%S [%L] "

runexec

type: boolean
default: false
Run executable file on Enter or l.

scrollbind scb

type: boolean
default: false
When this option is set, vifm will try to keep difference of scrolling positions of two windows constant.

scrolloff so

type: int
default: 0
Minimal number of screen lines to keep above and below the cursor. If you want cursor line to always be in the middle of the view (except at the beginning or end of the file list), set this option to some large value (e.g. 999).

shell sh

type: string
default: $SHELL or "sh" or "cmd" (on MS-Windows)
Full path to the shell to use to run external commands.

shortmess shm

type: charset
default: ""
Contains a sequence of single-character flags. Each flag enables shortening of some message displayed by vifm in the TUI. Flags:
T − truncate status-bar messages in the middle if they are too long to fit on the command line. "..." will appear in the middle.

slowfs

type: string list

default: ""
only for *nix
A list of mounter fs name beginnings (first column in /etc/mtab or /proc/mounts) that work too slow for you. This option can be used to stop vifm from making some requests to particular kinds of file systems that can slow down file browsing. Currently this means don’t check if directory has changed and do not check if target of symbolic links exists.

smartcase scs

type: boolean
default: false
Overrides the ignorecase option if the search pattern contains at least one upper case character. Only used when ignorecase option is enabled. It doesn’t affect file filtering.

sort

type: string list

default: +name on *nix and +iname on Windows
type: local
Sets list of sorting keys (first item is primary key, second is secondary key, etc.):
[+−]ext − sort by extension
[+−]name − sort by name (including extension)
[+−]iname − sort by name (including extension, ignores case)
[+−]gid − sort by group id (*nix only)
[+−]gname − sort by group name (*nix only)
[+−]mode − sort by mode (*nix only)
[+−]perms − sort by permissions string (*nix only)
[+−]uid − sort by owner id (*nix only)
[+−]uname − sort by owner name (*nix only)
[+−]size − sort by size
[+−]atime − sort by time accessed
[+−]ctime − sort by time changed
[+−]mtime − sort by time modified

´+’ means ascending sort for this key, and ’−’ means descending sort.

In case name (iname on Windoes) is skipped, it will be added at the end automatically.

This option also changes view columns according to primary sorting key set, unless ’viewcolumns’ option is not empty.
sortnumbers

type: boolean
default: false
type: local
Natural sort of (version) numbers within text.

statusline stl

type: string
default: ""
Determines the content of the status line (the line right above command-line). Empty string means use same format like in previous versions. Following macros are supported:

− %t − file name (considering value of the ’classify’ option)

− %A − file attributes (permissions on *nix or properties on Windows)

− %u − user name or uid (if it cannot be resolved)

− %g − group name or gid (if it cannot be resolved)

− %s − file size in human readable format

− %E − size of selected files in human readable format, same as %s when no files are selected, except that it will never show size of ../ in visual mode, since it cannot be selected

− %d − file modification date (uses ’timefmt’ option)

− all ’rulerformat’ macros

Percent sign can be followed by optional minimum field width. Add ’−’ before minimum field width if you want field to be right aligned. Example:

 set statusline="  %t%= %A %10u:%−7g %15s %20d "

On Windows file properties include next flags (upper case means flag is on):
A − archive
H − hidden
I − content isn’t indexed
R − readonly
S − system
C − compressed
D − directory
E − encrypted
P − reparse point (e.g. symbolic link)
Z − sparse file

sortorder

type: enumeration
default: ascending
Sets sort order for primary key: ascending, descending.

tabstop ts

type: integer
default: value from curses library
Number of spaces that a Tab in the file counts for.

timefmt

type: string
default: " %m/%d %H:%M"
Format of time in file list. See man date or man strftime for details.

timeoutlen tm

type: integer
default: 1000
The time in milliseconds that is waited for a mapped key in case of already typed key sequence is ambiguous.

trash

type: boolean

default: true
Use trash directory. See "Trash directory" section below.

trashdir

type: string
default: "$HOME/.vifm/Trash"
Sets path to trash directory. Value of the option can contain environment variables (in form "$envname"), which will be expanded (prepend it with a slash to prevent expansion). The value should expand to an absolute path.

Will attempt to create the directory if it does not exist. See "Trash directory" section below.

undolevels ul

type: integer
default: 100
Maximum number of changes that can be undone.

vicmd

type: string

default: "vim"
The actual command used to start vi. Ampersand sign at the end (regardless whether it’s preceded by space or not) means backgrounding of command.

viewcolumns

type: string
default: ""
type: local
Format string containing list of columns in the view. When this option is empty view columns to show are chosen automatically using sorting keys (see ’sort’) as a base. Value of this option is ignored if ’lsview’ is set. See Column view section below for format description.

An example of setting the options for both panes (note vifm-windo command):

 windo set viewcolumns=-{name}..,6{size},11{perms}

vixcmd

type: string

default: value of vicmd
The command used to start vi when in X. Ampersand sign at the end (regardless whether it’s preceded by space or not) means backgrounding of command.

vifminfo

type: set
default: bookmarks

Controls what will be saved in the $VIFM/vifminfo file.
options − all options that can be set with the :set command
filetypes − associated programs and viewers
commands − user defined commands (see :command description)
bookmarks − bookmarks, except special ones like ’< and ’>
tui − state of the user interface (sorting, number of windows, quick
view state, active view)
dhistory − directory history
state − file name and dot filters and terminal multiplexers integration
state
cs − default color scheme
savedirs − save last visited directory (needs dhistory)
chistory − command line history
shistory − search history (/ and ? commands)
phistory − prompt history
fhistory − filter history (see description of the "=" normal mode command)
dirstack − directory stack overwrites previous stack, unless stack of
current session is empty
registers − registers content
vimhelp

type: boolean
default: false
Use vim help format.

wildmenu wmnu

type: boolean
default: false
Controls whether possible matches of completion will be shown above the command line.

wrap

type: boolean

default: true
Controls whether to wrap text in quick view.

wrapscan ws

type: boolean
default: true
Searches wrap around end of the list.

Mappings

Since it’s not easy to enter special characters there are several special sequences that can be used in place of them. They are:

<cr>

Enter key

<bs>

Backspace key

<tab> <s-tab>

Tabulation and Shift+Tabulation keys

<esc> <space> <home> <end> <left> <right> <up> <down> <pageup>
<pagedown>

Keys with obvious names.

<del> <delete>

Delete key. <del> and <delete> mean different codes, but <delete> is more common.

<c-a>,<c-b>,...,<c-z>,<c-[>,<c->,<c-]>,<c-^>,<c-_>

Control + some key.

<a-a>,<a-b>,...,<a-z>

<m-a>,<m-b>,...,<m-z> Alt + some key.

<a-c-a>,<a-c-b>,...,<a-c-z>

<m-c-a>,<m-c-b>,...,<m-c-z> only for *nix
Alt + Ctrl + some key.

<f0> − <f63>

Functional keys

<c-f1> − <c-f12>

only for MS-Windows
Functional keys with Control key pressed.

<a-f1> − <a-f12>

only for MS-Windows
Functional keys with Alt key pressed.

<s-f1> − <s-f12>

only for MS-Windows
Functional keys with Shift key pressed.

vifm removes whitespace characters at the beginning and end of commands. That’s why you may want to use <space> at the end of rhs in mappings. For example:

 cmap <f1> man<space>

will put "man " in line when you hit the <f1> key in the command line mode.

Expression syntax

Supported expressions is a subset of what VimL provides.

Expression syntax summary, from least to most significant:

vifm-expr1 expr2 == expr2 equal
expr2 != expr2 not equal

vifm-expr2 expr3 . expr3 .. string concatenation

vifm-expr3 "string" string constant, \ is special
’string’ string constant, ’ is doubled
$VAR environment variable
function(expr1, ...) function call

".." indicates that the operations in this level can be concatenated.

expr1
-----
expr2 {cmp} expr2

Compare two expr2 expressions, resulting in a 0 if it evaluates to false or 1 if it evaluates to true.

equal ==
notequal !=

Examples:

 ’a’ == ’a’    evaluates to 1
 ’a’ == ’b’    evaluates to 0

expr2
-----
expr3 . expr3 .. string concatenation

Examples:

 ’a’ . ’b’ = ’ab’
 ’aaa’ . ’’ . ’c’ = ’aaac’

expr3
-----

string
------
"string" string constant

Note that double quotes are used.

A string constant accepts these special characters:
\b backspace <bs>
\e escape <esc>
\n newline
\r return <cr>
\t tab <tab>
\\ backslash
\" double quote

Examples:

 "\"Hello,\tWorld!\""
 "Hi,\nthere!"

literal-string
--------------
´string’ string constant

Note that single quotes are used.

This string is taken as it is. No backslashes are removed or have a special meaning. The only exception is that two quotes stand for one quote.

Examples:

 ’All\slashes\are\saved.’
 ’This string contains doubled single quotes ’’here’’’

environment variable
--------------------
$VAR environment variable

The String value of any environment variable. When it is not defined, the result is an empty string.

Examples:

 ’This is my $PATH env: ’ . $PATH
 ’vifmrc at ’ . $MYVIFMRC . ’ is used.’

function call
-------------
function(expr1, ...) function call

See Functions section below.

Examples:

 "’" . filetype(’.’) . "’"
 filetype(’.’) == ’reg’

Functions

USAGE RESULT DESCRIPTION

expand({expr}) String Expand macros in {expr}.
filetype({fnum}) String Returns file type from position.

expand({expr})
Expands macros in {expr} just like it’s done for command-line commands. Returns a string. See "Command macros" section above. Examples:

  " percent sign
  :echo expand(’%%’)
  " the last part of directory name of the other pane
  :echo expand(’%D:t’)

filetype({fnum})
The result is a string, which represents file type and is one of the list:
exe executables
reg regular files
link symbolic links
dir directories
char character devices
block block devices
fifo pipes
sock *nix domain sockets
? unknown file type (should never appear)
Parameter {fnum} can have following values:
− ’.’ to get type of file under the cursor in the active pane

Menus and dialogs

General

j, k − move.
<Escape>, Ctrl-C, ZZ, ZQ − quit.
<Return>, l − select and exit the menu.
Ctrl-L − redraw the menu.

Escape, Ctrl-C, ZZ, ZQ, q − quit.

In all menus

Ctrl-B/Ctrl-F
Ctrl-D/Ctrl-U
Ctrl-E/Ctrl-Y
/ and ?, n/N
[num]G/[num]gg
H/M/L
zb/zt/zz
zh − scroll menu items [count] characters to the right.
zl − scroll menu items [count] characters to the left.
zH − scroll menu items half of screen width characters to the right.
zL − scroll menu items half of screen width characters to the left.

All these keys have the same meaning as in normal mode (but not L in filetype menu).

: − enter command line mode for menus (currently only :exi[t], :q[uit], :x[it] and :{range} are supported).

Apropos menu

l key won’t close the menu allowing user to pick another man page, use :q to close the menu.

Commands menu

dd on a command to remove.

Bookmarks menu

Escape or Ctrl-C to abort j and k to move through.
dd on a bookmark to remove.

Directory stack menu

Pressing l or Enter on directory name will rotate stack to place selected directory pair at the top of the stack.

Filetype menu

Commands from vifmrc or typed in command-line are displayed above empty line. All commands below empty line are from .desktop files.

Fileinfo dialog

Enter − close dialog
q − close dialog

Sort dialog

h − switch ascending/descending.
Space − switch ascending/descending.
q − close dialog

Attributes (permissions or properties) dialog

h − check/uncheck.
Space − check/uncheck.
q − close dialog

Item states:

* − checked flag.

X − means that it has different value for files in selection.

d (*nix only) − (only for execute flags) means u−x+X, g−x+X or o−x+X argument for the chmod program. If you want to remove execute right from all files, but preserve it for directories, set all execute flags to ’d’ and check ´Set Recursively’ flag.

Startup

On startup vifm determines several variables that are used during the session. They are determined in the order they appear below.

On *nix systems $HOME is normally present and used as is. On Windows systems vifm tries to find correct home directory in the following order:
− $HOME variable;
− $USERPROFILE variable;
− a combination of $HOMEDRIVE and $HOMEPATH variables.

vifm tries to find correct configuration directory by checking the following places:
− $VIFM variable;
− parent directory of the executable file (on Windows only);
− $HOME/.vifm directory;
− $APPDATA/Vifm directory (on Windows only).

vifm tries to find correct configuration file by checking the following places:
− $MYVIFMRC variable;
− vifmrc in parent directory of the executable file (on Windows only);
− $VIFM/vifmrc file.

Configure

See Startup section above for the explanations on $VIFM and $MYVIFMRC.

The vifmrc file contains commands that will be executed on vifm startup. See $MYVIFMRC variable description for search algorithm used to find vifmrc. Use it to set settings, mappings, filetypes etc. To use multi line commands precede each next line with a slash (whitespace before slash is ignored, but all spaces at the end of the lines are saved). For example:

  set
      \smartcase

equals "setsmartcase". When

  set<space here>
      \ smartcase

equals "set smartcase".

The $VIFM/vifminfo file contains session settings. You may edit it by hand to change the settings, but it’s not recommended to do that, edit vifmrc instead. You can control what settings will be saved in vifminfo by setting ´vifminfo’ option. Vifm always writes this file on exit unless ’vifminfo’ option is empty. Bookmarks, commands, directory history, filetypes, fileviewers and registers in the file are merged with vifm configuration (which has bigger priority).

The $VIFM/scripts directory can contain shell scripts. vifm modifies it’s PATH environment variable to let user run those scripts without specifying full path. All subdirectories of the $VIFM/scripts will be added to PATH too. Script in a subdirectory overlaps script with the same name in all its parent directories.

The $VIFM/colors directory contains color schemes.

Automatic FUSE mounts

vifm has a builtin support of automated FUSE file system mounts. It is implemented using file associations mechanism. To enable automated mounts, one needs to use a specially formated program line in filetype or filextype commands. Currently two formats are supported:

1) FUSE_MOUNT This format should be used in case when all information needed for mounting all files of a particular type is the same. E.g. mounting of tar files don’t require any file specific options.

Format line:
FUSE_MOUNT|mounter %SOURCE_FILE %DESTINATION_DIR [%CLEAR]

Example filetype command:

  :filetype FUSE_MOUNT|fuse−zip %SOURCE_FILE %DESTINATION_DIR

2) FUSE_MOUNT2 This format allows one to use specially formatted files to perform mounting and is useful for mounting remotes, for example remote file systems over ftp or ssh.

Format line:
FUSE_MOUNT2|mounter %PARAM %DESTINATION_DIR [%CLEAR]

Example filetype command:

  :filetype FUSE_MOUNT2|sshfs %PARAM %DESTINATION_DIR

Example file content:

    root@127.0.0.1:/

All % macros are expanded by vifm at runtime and have the following meaning:
− %SOURCE_FILE is replaced by full path to selected file
− %DESTINATION_DIR is replaced by full path to mount directory, which is created by vifm basing on the value of ’fusehome’ option.
− %PARAM value is filled from the first line of file (whole line), though in the future it can be changed to whole file content
− %CLEAR means that you want to clear screen before running mount command.

%CLEAR is an optional macro. Other macros are not mandatory, but mount commands likely won’t work without them.

The mounted FUSE file systems will be automatically unmounted in two cases:

when vifm quits (with ZZ, :q, etc. or when killed by signal)

when you explicitly leave mount point going up to its parent directory (with h, Enter on "../" or ":cd ..") and other pane is not in the same directory or its child directories.

View look

vifm supports displaying of file list view in two different ways:

in a table mode, when multiple columns can be set using ’viewcolumns’ option (see Column view section below for details);

in a multicolumn list manner which looks almost like ’ls −x’ command output (see ls-like view section below for details).

The look is local for each view and can be chosen by changing value of the ´lsview’ boolean option.

Depending on view look some of keys change their meaning to allow more natural cursor moving. This concerns mainly h, j, k, l and other similar navigation keys.

Also some of options can be ignored if they don’t affect view displaying in selected look. For example value of ’viewcolumns’ when ’lsview’ is set.

ls-like view

When this view look is enabled by setting ’lsview’ option on, vifm will display files in multiple columns. Number of columns depends on the length of the longest file name present in current directory of the view. Whole file list is automatically reflowed on directory change, terminal or view resize.

View looks close to output of ’ls −x’ command, so files are listed left to right in rows.

In this mode file manipulation commands (e.g. d) don’t work line-wise like they do in Vim, since such operations would be uncommon for file manipulating tasks. Thus, for example, dd will remove only current file.

Column view

View columns are described by a comma-separated list of column descriptions, each of which has the following format
[ ’−’ ] [ fw ( [ ’.’ tw ] | ’%’ ) ] ’{’ type ’}’ ’.’{0,3}
where fw stands for full width and tw stands for text width.

So it basically consists of four parts:
1. Optional alignment specifier
2. Optional width specifier
3. Mandatory column name
4. Optional cropping specifier

Alignment specifier

It’s an optional minus sign as the first symbol of the string.

Specifies type of text alignment within a column. Two types are supported:

left align

     set viewcolumns=−{name}

right align (default)

     set viewcolumns={name}

Width specifier

It’s a number followed by a percent sign, two numbers (second one should be less than or equal to the first one) separated with a dot or a single number.

Specifies column width and its units. There are tree size types:

absolute size − column width is specified in characters

     set viewcolumns=−100{name},20.15{ext}

results in two columns with lengths of 100 and 20 and a reserved space of five characters on the left of second column.

relative (percent) size − column width is specified in percents of view width

     set viewcolumns=−80%{name},15%{ext},5%{mtime}

results in three columns with lengths of 80/100, 15/100 and 5/100 of view width.

auto size (default) − column width is automatically determined

     set viewcolumns=−{name},{ext},{mtime}

results in three columns with length of one third of view width. There is no size adjustment to content, since it will slow down rendering.

Columns of different sizing types can be freely mixed in one view. Though sometimes some of columns can be seen partly or be completely invisible if there is not enough space to display them.

Column name

This is just a sort key surrounded with curly braces, e.g.

    {name},{ext},{mtime}

{name} and {iname} keys are the same and present both for consistency with ´sort’ option.

Empty curly braces ({}) are replaced with the default secondary column for primary sort key. So after the next command view will be displayed almost as if ’viewcolumns’ is empty, but adding ellipsis for long file names:

    set viewcolumns=−{name}..,6{}.

Cropping specifier

It’s from one to three dots after closing curly brace in column format.

Specifies type of text truncation if it doesn’t fix in the column. Currently tree types are supported:

truncation − text is truncated

     set viewcolumns=−{name}.

results in truncation of names that are too long too fit in the view.

adding of ellipsis − ellipsis on the left or right are added when needed

     set viewcolumns=−{name}..

results in that ellipsis are added at the end of too long file names.

none (default) − text can pass column boundaries

     set viewcolumns=−{name}...,{ext}

results in that long file names can partially be written on the ext column.

Color schemes

The color schemes in vifm can be applied in two different ways:

as the default (or main) color scheme

as local to a panel color scheme

Both types are set using |vifm−:colorscheme| command, but of different forms:

:colorscheme color_scheme_name − for the default color scheme

:colorscheme color_scheme_name directory − for local color schemes

Look of different parts of the TUI (Text User Interface) is determined in this way:

Border, TopLineSel, TopLine, CmdLine, ErrorMsg, StatusLine and WildMenu are always determined by the default color scheme

CurrLine, Selected, Directory, Link, BrokenLink, Socket, Device, Executable, Fifo and Win are determined by default color scheme and a set of local colorschemes, which can be empty

There might be a set of local color schemes because they are structured hierarchically according to file system structure. For example, having the following piece of file system:

 ~
 ’−− bin
    |
    ’−− my

Two color schemes:

 # ~/.vifm/colors/for_bin
 highlight Win cterm=none ctermfg=white ctermbg=red
 highlight CurrLine cterm=none ctermfg=red ctermbg=black


 # ~/.vifm/colors/for_bin_my
 highlight CurrLine cterm=none ctermfg=green ctermbg=black

And these three commands in the vifmrc file:

 colorscheme Default
 colorscheme for_bin ~/bin
 colorscheme for_bin_my ~/bin/my

File list will look in the following way for each level:

~/ − Default color scheme

black background
cursor with blue background

~/bin/ − mix of Default and for_bin color schemes

red background
cursor with black background and red foreground

~/bin/my/ − mix of Default, for_bin and for_bin_my color schemes

red background
cursor with black background and green foreground

Trash directory

vifm has support of trash directory, which is used as temporary storage for deleted files or files that were cut. Using trash is controlled by the ´trash’ option, and exact path to the trash can be set with ’trashdir’ option. Trash directory in vifm differs from the system-wide one by default, because of possible incompatibilities of storing deleted files among different file managers. But one can set ’trashdir’ to "~/.local/share/Trash" to use a "standard" trash directory.

There are two scenarios of using trash in vifm:

1.

As a place for storing files that were cut by "d" and may be inserted to some other place in file system.

2.

As a storage of files, that are deleted but not purged yet.

The first scenario uses deletion ("d") operations to put files to trash and put ("p") operations to restore files from trash directory. Note that such operations move files to and from trash directory, which can be long term operations in case of different partitions or remote drives mounted locally.

The second scenario uses deletion ("d") operations for moving files to trash directory and :empty command-line command to purge all previously deleted files.

Deletion and put operations depend on registers, which can point to files in trash directory. Normally, there are no nonexistent files in registers, but vifm doesn’t keep track of modifications under trash directory, so one shouldn’t expect value of registers to be absolutely correct if trash directory was modified not by operation that are meant for it. But this won’t lead to any issues with operations, since they ignore nonexistent files.

Client−Server

vifm supports remote execution of command-line mode commands as well as remote changing of directories. This is possible using −−remote command-line argument.

To execute a command remotely combine −−remote argument with −c <command> or +<command>. For example:

    vifm −−remote −c ’cd /’
    vifm −−remote ’+cd /’

To change directory not using command-line mode commands one can specify paths right after −−remote argument, like this:

    vifm −−remote /
    vifm −−remote ~
    vifm −−remote /usr/bin /tmp

At the moment there is no way of specifying, which instance of vifm should arguments be sent. The main purpose of −−remote argument is to provide support of using vifm as a single-instance application.

Plugin

Plugin for using vifm in vim as a file selector.

Commands:

:EditVifm select a file or files to open in the current buffer.
:SplitVifm split buffer and select a file or files to open.
:VsplitVifm vertically split buffer and select a file or files to open.
:DiffVifm select a file or files to compare to the current file with
:vert diffsplit.
:TabVifm select a file or files to open in tabs.

Each command accepts up to two arguments: left pane directory and right pane directory. After arguments are checked, vifm process is spawned in a special "file-picker" mode. To pick files just open them either by pressing l, i or Enter keys, or by running :edit command. If no files are selected, file under the cursor is opened, otherwise whole selection is passed to the plugin and opened in vim.

The plugin have only two settings. It’s a string variable named g:vifm_term to let user specify command to run gui terminal. By default it’s equal to ´xterm −e’. And another string variable named g:vifm_exec, which equals "vifm" by default and specifies path to vifm’s executable. To pass arguments to vifm use g:vifm_exec_args, which is empty by default.

To use the plugin copy the vifm.vim file to either the system wide vim/plugin directory or into ~/.vim/plugin.

If you would prefer not to use the plugin and it is in the system wide plugin directory add

let loaded_vifm=1

to your ~/.vimrc file.

Reserved

The following command names are reserved and shouldn’t be used for user commands.

g[lobal]
v[global]

SEE ALSO

Website: http://vifm.sourceforge.net/

Esperanto translation of the documentation by Sebastian Cyprych:
http://cyprych.neostrada.pl/tekstoj/komputiloj/vifm-help.eo.html

AUTHOR

Vifm was written by ksteen <ksteen@users.sourceforge.net>
And currently is developed by xaizek <xaizek@openmailbox.org>